The UN2030 Sustainable Development Goals, formalised by the United Nations in September 2015, provides a foundation for action to solve some of the worlds’s most difficult challenges. 193 UN General Assembly members adopted these Goals.

Dreamcatcher South African has been guided by the UN SDG’s since 2000 and Cop26 Directive since the Paris 2015 Agreement. A key part of our work has been to address sustainability to address social justice, which affects so many of the goals. We worked across township communities in South Africa and globally to build a team of women to empower, instil leadership and work together creatively to address the goals for sustainable outcomes. On this page we sum up the actions we have undertaken and continue to do so, to address each of these UN Sustainable Development Goals and Cop2 Directive. We take pride in the irrefutable results that are visible in the communities. Particularly in South Africa where we started out. We are sharing skills with our local partners in the destinations, where women are strong change makers. Women and Youth are critical to ensure sustainable futures for all.

We believe that affirmation of diversity, women and youth are critical to ensure sustainable futures for all.

The 17 goals offer tremendous opportunities to form partnerships between Private, Public, Local Social Sectors (those community based organisations who have local engagement for sustainable community development as their primary goal, are community driven and outcomes based). The 4th partner to move proactively forward is the Academic sector. It is vital to provide reliable data on needs and performance and link it to impact data to assess progress at local level.

“The outfall of the Covid Pandemic globally and its impact particularly on vulnerable people, resonates with us all. Reminded by the profound statement of Martin Luther King on April 16, 1963. “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.’As global citizens, we are more than ever, caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied into a single garment of destiny. Dreamcatcher’s work is thus inspired by Nelson Mandela’s comment: “Something is only impossible until it’s done.” ‘Therefore, we are committed do our part to address the UN SDG’s and COP26 Goals. Working in an integrated manner we will continue to work to turn the impossible into the possible. It’s the Dreamcatcher Way.”

Our founder Anthea

By creating enterprises and stimulating local job creation we are fighting poverty. We are increasing the income streams in the community by diversifying the job opportunities in the communities. A circular economy makes sure that the money that is earned in the community stays there and simulates local socio-economic growth.

The main reason for hunger is poverty. People we work with are earning at least enough to foresee in the basic needs of them and their family. We are duplicating the Dreamcatcher project called Back 2 Front Yard Farming (B2FYF). This means that we provide the skills and knowledge to our local community partners to grow their own food. In this way we address food poverty and nutrition.

Aside from working on nutrition and hygiene, we inform and train our partners to combat disease and injuries. One of the actions we undertake is training first aid responders in local communities. They are also on stand-by for incidents or injuries of tourists.

STEPi (Squaring The Education Pyramid Institute) is an organization that aims to prepare children for a prosperous adulthood. We want to assure that children have great choices when they reach maturity. Aside from this project that Dreamcatcher is supporting, we offer training about jobs, nutrition, first aid, environment,…

Throughout African communities we recognise the cultural tradition that males provide the main income. To increase the economic self-sufficiency of families we diversify income streams by offering women the chance to be entrepreneurs. Some options are opening a Homestay, hosting a (legally branded) Cook-Up with Kamamma, etc.

Vast areas where our community engagement and socio-economic development projects are run, are situated in areas impacted by protracted drought. With water in short supply and expensive where it is on tap, each drop is used for household use with no incentives to grow food, which once again is expensive to buy. Our project, running in tandem with the composting project, is to conserve the rain water in conservancy tanks when it does occur, transfer skills to grow food and edible herbs in small patches in cyclical fashion using this conserved water. The first positive impacts of this initiative are starting to show great promise and interest to get back to basics: making nature work to ensure the crops.

We promote the use of renewable energy (solar and wind power). We are working with partners to provide this in the communities.

By creating enterprises and stimulating local job creation we are fighting poverty. Though we are not replacing the traditional industries that are already there. A circular economy makes sure that the money that is earned in the community stays there and simulates local socio-economic growth.

By offering women the chance to be entrepreneurs and create sustainable opportunities, we reduce gender inbalance. We aspire to be a platform which tailors to tourists of any race and sexuality. Through the Dreamcatcher inclusive development programmes we encourage diversity.

We are increasing the income streams in the community by diversifying the job opportunities in the communities. A circular economy makes sure that the money that is earned in the community stays there and simulates local socio-economic growth. The impact of tourism and economic growth is monitored to ensure local community life is undisturbed and cultural traditions are respected. The health and environmental impact of waste are managed. We stimulate water conservation and renewable energy. The education is purposed to inform the locals about the importance of their environment and the local species.

The “Waste, It’s Mine, It’s Yours” project of Dreamcatcher has received global recognition. Waste is re-used to produce new products, which creates jobs and new income stream whilst benefitting the local environment.

The “Waste, It’s Mine, It’s Yours” project of Dreamcatcher has received global recognition. Waste is re-used to produce new products, which creates jobs and new income stream whilst benefitting the local environment. We stimulate water conservation and renewable energy. The education is purposed to inform the locals about the importance of protecting their environment and the local species.

We collaborate with local authorities to combat waste dumping in the ocean or on beaches. We organise beach clean-ups to collect marine plastics and motivate locals to re-use the waste to create new products and incomes.

The “Waste, It’s Mine, It’s Yours” project of Dreamcatcher has received global recognition. Waste is re-used to produce new products, which creates jobs and new income stream whilst benefitting the local environment. We stimulate water conservation and renewable energy. The education is purposed to inform the locals about the importance of protecting their environment and the local species. We use invador plant species in crafts which are sold to return the land to indigenous species.

Justice means that nobody is excluded from the economic benefits in any industry, for example tourism. We make sure that locals profit from their own companies, after a history of exploitation of African resources.  ALAAPii views the local people as the ultimate custodians of the local environment and thus its sustainability. Historically ownership in tourism enterprises was not within the reach of Africans. We want to change this narrative by empowering local enterprises and reducing the loss of profits out of Africa.

We collaborate with local partners in over 10 countries at the moment. ALAAPii educates them about all of these actions and the importance of them. Then we help them with setting up similar projects in their local communities. (Current partners can be found in South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Kenia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Ghana, Benin,…)